Newsrooms Must Learn How to Use AI: ‘Trust in Journalism is at Stake’

Newsrooms Must Learn How to Use AI: ‘Trust in Journalism is at Stake’

The Associated Press has been using AI and algorithms for four years to help journalists to find and break news faster. But are robots the future of journalism?

[Photo:    Pixabay   ]

[Photo: Pixabay]

Machine learning, algorithms and natural language processing are now becoming common ways to talk about how we report, produce and distribute the news.

Although artificial intelligence (AI) can be trained to recognize faces and objects, understand languages, solve problems and produce thousands of articles from different data sets, can robots really do the job of a journalist?

Lisa Gibbs, business editor for The Associated Press explained how the publisher has been using artificial intelligence over the past four years.

"We are still at the very early stages of figuring out how to apply this technology to what journalists do," she said, speaking at the Google News Initiative last week (7 December).

"At the Associated Press, we have been experimenting with automation and AI to eliminate routine work, like video transcription, so that our journalists can focus on doing the creative and curious work."

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